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Marchiona’s last meeting is brief

PENN YAN—Douglas Marchionda Jr. conducted his final meeting as Penn Yan mayor on Feb. 15, ending 12 years on the village board, the last eight years as mayor. The board meeting lasted just over one hour in contrast to many recent meetings lasting more than three hours.
The village has received a request from Sandy King for a gathering in the village, either at Sarrasin’s or at the school on April 15. The event is associated with Tea Party, the conservative movement. The organization has been called a nationally coordinated protest opposing big government. Local participants will march from the starting point to the Yates County office building. Marchionda said village streets cannot be used for the march. He said he asked King how many people she expected and she told him she hopes for 500 participants.
The meeting began with three public hearings. The first was for the Financial Management and Investment Policy Chapter of the village code. The second was to support Finger Lakes Economic Development to apply for a Community Development Block Grant in the amount of $250,000 for Data Listing Services, LLC Call Center. A portion of a building in the Industrial Park at 240 North Avenue is being renovated for the business, which is expected to begin operations within the next few weeks.
There were no comments made during either of the first two public hearings.
There was more discussion during a public hearing on a grant through the Small Cities Grant Program for projects on Keuka, Seneca, and Sheppard Streets. This grant would be through the State Office of Community Renewal. The purpose of the grant is stated to be water and sewer improvements. Village public works Director Richard Osgood spoke to the board about the project, noting a 98 percent response to a survey proving need is required. Osgood said there are nine addresses on Seneca Street that have not completed surveys. He said he expects to go door to door to explain the importance of completing the confidential surveys. He said they would like to focus on water for Seneca Street. Osgood said the engineering report must be sent to the grant writer by March 1.
In other business: Village Attorney Ed Brockman said the Department of Disabilities Services Office (DDSO) had withdrawn their application for village services for their Rt. 364 property. At the time of their request, village officials suggested they consider annexation into the village or formation of a water district that would serve their area. Brockman said the facility will put in their own system.
• Trustee Robert Hoban reported on the village planning and development committee. He said the group has been meeting on the Keuka Outlet Improvement Project. The group has been discussing zoning. He asked the board to accept Richard Osgood’s resignation from the village planning board, effective March 31. Hoban said, “He has been excellent to work with. He has vision and the ability to work with other people.”
• The board approved a tree survey to be conducted by Cornell Cooperative Extension at a cost not to exceed $3,000. Hoban expressed concern regarding the 50 to 60 trees a year that are removed from the village right of way.
• Trustees approved a number of changes for village vehicles. The cemetery pickup truck, a 1999 Dodge, was declared surplus and will be sold on eBay. A 2002 Chevy 2500 with a plow will be transferred from the wastewater treatment plant to the cemetery at a cost of $10,325. Also approved was a motion to purchase a 2008 Ford F250 with plow from the Water Treatment Plant for the Wastewater Treatment Plant at a cost of $16,875. A three quarter ton long box pickup truck with plow will be purchased off State Bid for the Water Treatment Plant.
• Marchionda announced the Reading Across the Community celebration will be at 10 a.m. on March 3.
The next meeting of the Penn Yan village board will be at 6 p.m. on March 16 in the village office building on Elm Street. 
 


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